Redlining in Chicago Communities Part II - The Color Tax: Origins of the Modern-Day Racial Wealth Gap

Date December 8, 2020
Location Zoom Meeting
Time 11:30 a.m. - 1:00 p.m. (CT)
2020-12-08 11:30:00 2020-12-08 13:00:00 CREW Chicago Redlining in Chicago Communities Part II 11:30 a.m. CT Redlining in Chicago Communities Part II - The Color Tax: Origins of the Modern-Day Racial Wealth Gap Zoom Meeting -event@crewnetwork.org

Redlining in Chicago Communities Part II - The Color Tax: Origins of the Modern-Day Racial Wealth Gap

CREW Chicago and Chicago African-Americans in Commercial Real Estate (Chi-AACRE), are proud to present Part 2 of their collaboration examining the impacts of redlining. In this feature, CREW Chicago and Chi-AACRE present an exclusive screening of Bruce Orenstein’s documentary film: The Color Tax: Origins of the Modern-Day Racial Wealth Gap. 

Premiered last year at the Federal Reserve Bank of Chicago, The Color Tax tells the story of how a system of predatory home contract sales during the 1950s and 60s plundered enormous sums of wealth from the pockets of black families seeking homeownership. But unlike what happened in other cities, Chicago’s families fought back in one of city’s most heart-wrenching and perilous campaigns for racial and economic justice. Reverend William Barber, co-director of the National Poor People’s Campaign, A National Call for Moral Revival writes, The Color Tax paints with vivid clarity perhaps America's most striking example of systemic racism. 

“In a word, it was RAW, and A MUST SEE. This is a history I'm sure many of us have heard of, however, for me at least, a born and raised Chicagoan, NEVER, realized the cruelty of the system, nor the depth of the strengths and sacrifices of our parents, and their parents. This is important, not only for us, but equally for our children to see and gain a better appreciation for our varied struggles.”
Eugene Varando
Trustee of Providence Bank & Trust

America's most striking example of systemic racism. The screening is 37 minutes and space is limited.Following the film, Bruce Orenstein and Dr. Clinton Boyd Jr. will join us in a discussion and Q/A. 
Bruce Orenstein 
Artist in Residence at the Samuel DuBois Cook Center on Social Equity; Director of Telling Stories of Social Injustice Working Group 
Dr. Clinton Boyd Jr. 
Postdoctoral Associate, Samuel DuBois Cook Center on Equity at Duke University 

Speakers:

Bruce Orenstein 
Artist in Residence at the Samuel DuBois Cook Center on Social Equity; Director of Telling Stories of Social Injustice Working Group
BIO


Dr. Clinton Boyd Jr. 
Postdoctoral Associate, Samuel DuBois Cook Center on Equity at Duke University
BIO

Tuesday, December 8, 2020
11:30 a.m. - 1 p.m.
Virtual Event
Registration closes December 4, 2020

No charge Members and Nonmembers
A Zoom Link will be provided to the registered guests